A Cool Quote…

I read a book on grading tonight in preparation for an admin. meeting tomorrow and I ran across this quote:

“The test of a successful education is not the amount of knowledge that a pupil takes away from school, but his appetite to know and his capacity to learn. If the school sends out children with the desire for knowledge and some idea how to acquire it, it will have done its work. Too many leave school with the appetite killed and the mind loaded with undigested lumps of information.”

– Sir Richard Livingston (1941 – President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford)

I like this quote. I think it could use some 21st century words like create and collaborate, but I still like it. ūüôā

Found in:

A Repair Kit For Grading by Ken O’Connor

Looking To Boost Achievement?…Try Some Non-Fiction Writing

I’m a Douglas Reeves fan, so this post might show some bias.

Tonight while catching up on some blog reading in Google Reader I ran across a new post on The American School Board Journal blog; The Leading Source –¬†“Writhing a Critical Skill, as if you needed to tell us that.” ¬†I won’t recap the short post but it lead me to look at the recent article published in the ASBJ by Douglas Reeves – “Writing Boosts Achievement.”

Of course I don’t have an actual subscription to the ABSJ, and I did not want to shell out my morning coffee money to purchase the article, so I turned to my friend and¬†confidant¬†Google. ¬†After a quick google search for the article I was magically swept away to Douglas Reeves’s consulting website (The Leadership and Learning Center), where he keeps full PDF text for many of his articles, past and present. ¬†SCORE! ¬†C

heck out this treasure trove of reading by clicking the image below:

Mr. Reeves makes some great points in his article:

  • “when students improve the¬†quaintly and quality of their writing, they improve in reading comprehension, math, science, and social studies.”
  • “Employers spend more than¬†$3 billion¬†each year teaching writing skills to¬†employees, much of which could be¬†saved if schools and students devoted¬†more time and attention to writing.”
  • “…research that shows that, when students¬†improve their ability to describe,¬†explain, and persuade in writing, they¬†also improve their reading comprehension.”

Please do go and read the article for yourself!

Some points to ponder:

  • Is writing a focus where you lead or teach?
  • How do you provide your students with an authentic platform for writing? ¬†Are your students blogging?
  • How do we move students from the 140 character mindset to authentic non-fiction writing response and craft?
  • How do we increase expectation for writing rigor in our schools?
  • Do you model good writing¬†for your staff and students?

I know when I was a teacher giving my students blogs gave them a platform for writing and truly inspired them to showcase their growing writing skills to the world.  Checkout these two student blogging platforms:  Edublogs and Kidblogs.

-CA-

cross posted on my blog: Teach It, Tech It, Learn It, Lead It